Are You Proactive or Reactive?

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Are You Proactive or Reactive?

When it comes to your health, ask yourself this question:

“Am I proactive or reactive?”

Being reactive means taking action only when you’re in pain.

Being proactive means doing what it takes to maintain good health.

Being reactive means getting up off the couch because your family member or friend told you so.

Being proactive means getting up off the couch and being active because you want to and you know it is good for you!

Being reactive means grabbing the quickest source of sugary sweets to combat a stressful moment.

Being proactive means eating healthy food (including healthy fats) when you’re hungry and when you need it most to properly maintain healthy stress levels.

Reactive = Symptoms

Being reactive can often be tied to symptoms. When you experience pain, this symptom tells you that something’s wrong and needs to be corrected. Correcting the cause of the symptom takes a level of commitment and sacrifice.

It takes being proactive.

No matter where you are on the reactive/proactive spectrum, we are committed to helping you maintain a healthy lifestyle.

What motivates you to make good choices about maintaining your health? Are you proactive or reactive when it comes to those choices?


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Are Your Feet Causing Back Pain?

Back pain can be a debilitating condition. When you suffer with it, there is nothing you want more than to get rid of the pain. So, what role do your feet play in the cause of your back pain? It’s all about structure. Our technology has evolved faster than our bodies. People were not designed to walk on hard surfaces like tile, marble, wood, or concrete—instead, we were designed to walk on grass, dirt, sand, mud, and other natural terrain. These natural, softer terrains are more conforming to the shape and structure of the foot, thereby keeping the arch supported, and causing the muscles, ligaments and tendons of the foot and ankle to work in a supportive fashion.

The Connection to Low Back Pain

The three main shock absorbers of the body are the feet, knees, and lower back. It only makes sense that if the feet are flat (unsupported by the ground or shoes) they are not absorbing shock. When that happens, the knees have to work twice as hard, but that can only go on for so long. Eventually, the lower back takes the heat. It now has to make up for the extra shock, and that can wear out the parts, particularly if there is a misalignment of the lower back or pelvis. Imagine a bent axle of a car, riding off road with a tire that is underinflated, with a cracked spring for the shocks!

So what can you do? Here are a few tips:

  1. Wear good structured shoes or sneakers that support the foot and absorb shock.
  2. Wear a custom orthotic made by someone who understands the structural relationship of the foot and the body (if that is out of your budget, a generic may be sufficient, but understand that it will not be made specifically for you).
  3. Have your spine, pelvis, and lower extremities specifically adjusted at our practice.

Wondering what else you can do to combat low back pain? Ask us at your next visit.

Back pain can be a debilitating condition. When you suffer with it, there is nothing you want more than to get rid of the pain. So, what role do your feet play in the cause of your back pain? It’s all about structure.


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Johnstone Chiropractic | (425) 334-1874
Proudly serving Lake Stevens and Marysville since 1997.
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